Subscribe to RSS Subscribe to Comments

Teaching Hacks.com

More Streaming Video

I mentioned that I had found a number of streaming satellite television web sites before. This time Rob pointed me over to Videohybrid, where you can watch full length movies and television shows online. Again, I do question the legality of the web site and could see it being shut down by copyright holders in the very near future, but it is worth a look.

—————————-

Update: You may have to try the web site again later, as it is quite busy.

Remixing Tools For Educators Using Video Sharing Sites

I’m compiling a list of third party tools that educators can use in conjunction with video sharing sites like Youtube for future workshop. I would appreciate it if you shared any other video remixing tools that you have used.

Adding Subtitles

http://www.overstream.net/ – Overstream
http://mojiti.com/ – Mojiti

Enhancing Videos

http://www.bubbleply.com/ – BubblePly (Adds pop-up bubbles on top of videos with hyperlinks)
http://www.gotuit.com/scenemaker/index.html (Lets you bookmark or “deep tag” specific scenes within an online video)
UPDATE: http://www.cuts.com/ Cuts – Add captions, skips and loops.

Downloading YouTube A Few of Many Tools

http://keepvid.com/ – KeepVid
http://www.benjaminstrahs.com/itube.php – Ares Tube
http://www.saveyoutube.com/ – Save You Tube
http://zamzar.com/ – ZamZar
http://www.oyoom.com/ – OYOOM

Online File Conversion

http://mux.am/ – mux video converter

Presentation Tools

http://scrapblog.com/preview/– Scrapblog allows YouTube Video Embedding

Using Online Videos to Drive My Own Professional Development

I really am amazed when I look at all the resources that are freely available that help educators to drive their own professional development. I don’t really care what you want to call it “personal learning environment”, “professional learning environment” or "ple." Arguing over syntax seems like a waste of time to me and doesn’t seem to go anywhere. (i.e. “learning objects”)

Aside from online communities, blogs and podcasts, I personally enjoy watching keynote, conference presentations and a variety of video content that has been archived online. I find that these are often the greatest motivators that help immerse me in new innovations or just inspire me.

Here my current favourites:

NECC2006 and here (I hope to make it to this conference)

Building Learning Communities 2006 (I hope to make it to this conference)

Teachers.tv

TedTalks

Curriculum Services Canada

Cue Conference

Leading Learning 2006

Leading Learning 2005

Annenberg Media Center

Google Video engEDU and Educational Genre

Frontline

When I feel the need to start looking at Higher Ed. materials:

Stanford on iTunes

Berkeley
on iTunes

MIT World

Archive.org

Please feel free to add your favourites.

(Ah! – Alan – I created another list again – shall we start another shared tag in del.icio.us?)

Update:

I have added the shared tag "pdvideo" in del.icio.us for adding any resources to the list. If you need a batch renaming tool for del.icio.us try Scripted Remark, it worked well for me.

Curriculum Resource Bank

The Curriculum Resource Bank is a great place to download great video and print resources to use in a k-12 classroom.

The CRB has over 20,000 different learning objects which are connected to Ontario curriculum expectations. The video clips are curriculum focused and include entire television shows from TV Ontario ( PBS in other places). The search engine is good but needs to be a little more intuitive. It would also be nice if it could remember my previous searches to save me some time. The organization and indexing of segments of shows helped me save time when searching for content matching the curriculum expectations I was covering in my classroom.

One of the features I really enjoyed was the ability to download video content to my home computer and burn it to a CD to ensure the videos were ready for classroom presentations. Copyright allows for classroom presentations for educators. The lessons associated the videos were good, but I preferred using my own lessons.

BEST feature – â€? The CRB is now available as a no-fee resource to public educators and students throughout Ontario.â€? It is available to other users with a modest subscription fee.

Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Canada License.